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Scientific Articles   |    
The Posterior Iliac Crest Outperforms the Anterior Iliac Crest When Obtaining Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Bone Marrow
Michela Pierini, PhD1; Claudia Di Bella, MD2; Barbara Dozza, PhD1; Tommaso Frisoni, MD1; Elisa Martella, MS1; Chiara Bellotti, MS1; Daniel Remondini, PhD3; Enrico Lucarelli, MS1; Sandro Giannini, MD1; Davide Donati, MD1
1 Osteoarticular Regeneration Laboratory, 2nd Clinic of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna, Italy. E-mail address for M. Pierini: michela.pierini@ior.it. E-mail address for B. Dozza: barbara.dozza@ior.it. E-mail address for T. Frisoni: tommaso.frisoni@ior.it. E-mail address for E. Martella: elisa.martella@ior.it. E-mail address for C. Bellotti: chiara.bellotti@ior.it. E-mail address for E. Lucarelli: enrico.lucarelli@ior.it. E-mail address for S. Giannini: sandro.giannini@ior.it. E-mail address for D. Donati: davide.donati@ior.it
2 Orthopaedic Department, St. Vincent’s Hospital, 41 Victoria Parade, Fitzroy VIC3065, Melbourne, Australia. E-mail address: claudibella@hotmail.it
3 Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna, Italy. E-mail address: daniel.remondini@unibo.it
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Investigation performed at the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna, Italy



Disclosure: One or more of the authors received payments or services, either directly or indirectly (i.e., via his or her institution), from a third party in support of an aspect of this work. None of the authors, or their institution(s), have had any financial relationship, in the thirty-six months prior to submission of this work, with any entity in the biomedical arena that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. Also, no author has had any other relationships, or has engaged in any other activities, that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. The complete Disclosures of Potential Conflicts of Interest submitted by authors are always provided with the online version of the article.

Copyright © 2013 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2013 Jun 19;95(12):1101-1107. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.L.00429
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Abstract

Background: 

The clinical application of freshly isolated connective-tissue progenitors, as well as the potential preparation of culture-expanded mesenchymal stem cell populations for therapeutic applications, will benefit from clinical methods that maximize the yield of the starting population. We compared the number of cells, concentration, and prevalence of colony-founding connective-tissue progenitors from the anterior and posterior iliac crest. In addition, we compared the expansion kinetics and multilineage differentiation potential of their culture-expanded progeny when processed to form mesenchymal stem cells.

Methods: 

Marrow aspirate was collected from both the anterior and posterior iliac crest of twenty-two patients. The concentration and prevalence of colony-founding connective-tissue progenitors were estimated with use of a colony formation assay. The expansion kinetics and multilineage differentiation potential of the culture-expanded mesenchymal stem cell populations derived from these starting samples were compared.

Results: 

The yield of colony-founding connective-tissue progenitors was 1.6 times greater in the posterior compared with the anterior iliac crest. No differences were found with respect to the viability, phenotype, expansion kinetics, or multilineage differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cell populations derived from these two sites.

Conclusions: 

The concentration and yield of colony-founding connective-tissue progenitors were greater when aspirate was obtained from the posterior compared with the anterior iliac crest, whereas the biological potential of the cells derived from these sites appeared comparable.

Clinical Relevance: 

The harvesting of bone marrow from the posterior iliac crest appears to be preferred, as it provided a modestly higher concentration of colony-founding connective-tissue progenitors than comparable aspirate from the anterior iliac crest.

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    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
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