0
Scientific Articles   |    
Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life After Surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis and Spondylolisthesis
Ilkka Helenius, MD, PhD1; Ville Remes, MD, PhD2; Tommi Lamberg, MD, PhD3; Dietrich Schlenzka, MD, PhD3; Mikko Poussa, MD, PhD3
1 Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland. E-mail address: ilkka.helenius@helsinki.fi
2 Peijas Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 900, FIN-00029, Helsinki, Finland
3 ORTON Orthopaedic Hospital, Invalid Foundation, Tenholantie 10, FIN-00280 Helsinki, Finland
View Disclosures and Other Information
Disclosure: In support of their research for or preparation of this work, one or more of the authors received, in any one year, outside funding or grants in excess of $10,000 from the Foundation for Pediatric Research, Instrumentarium Scientific Foundation, Päivikki and Sakari Sohlberg Foundation, Emil Aaltonen Foundation, Orion Research Foundation, and Paulo Foundation. Neither they nor a member of their immediate families received payments or other benefits or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity. No commercial entity paid or directed, or agreed to pay or direct, any benefits to any research fund, foundation, division, center, clinical practice, or other charitable or nonprofit organization with which the authors, or a member of their immediate families, are affiliated or associated.
A commentary is available with the electronic versions of this article, on our web site (www.jbjs.org) and on our quarterly CD-ROM (call our subscription department, at 781-449-9780, to order the CD-ROM).
Investigation performed at ORTON Orthopaedic Hospital and Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland

The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2008 Jun 01;90(6):1231-1239. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.G.00114
5 Recommendations (Recommend) | 3 Comments | Saved by 3 Users Save Case

Abstract

Background: The aim of surgical treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is primarily to prevent progression and secondarily to correct the deformity, whereas the goal of surgical treatment of pediatric spondylolisthesis is mainly to relieve pain and, in patients with a high-grade slip, to prevent progression. The aim of this study was to compare the long-term health-related quality of life after surgery for idiopathic scoliosis and spondylolisthesis in adolescence.

Methods: One hundred and ninety patients, with a mean age of fifteen years, who were treated surgically for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and 270 patients, with a mean age of sixteen years, who were treated surgically for low-grade or high-grade spondylolisthesis participated in the present study. The mean duration of follow-up was 14.8 years for the scoliosis group and 17.0 years for the spondylolisthesis group. Radiographs were made preoperatively, at the time of the two-year follow-up, and at the time of the final follow-up. Additionally, a physical examination was performed, and the Scoliosis Research Society-24 and Short Form-36 questionnaires were completed at the final follow-up evaluation.

Results: The median total score on the Scoliosis Research Society questionnaire was 102 (range, 63 to 118) for the scoliosis group and 95 (range, 42 to 115) for the spondylolisthesis group (p < 0.001). After adjusting for age at the time of surgery, gender, and duration of follow-up, the patients with scoliosis had a significantly higher odds ratio for a good total score (=90 points) on the Scoliosis Research Society questionnaire than did patients with spondylolisthesis (odds ratio, 2.65 [95% confidence interval, 1.58 to 4.44]; p = 0.0002). Patients in the scoliosis group had better values for general self-image, postoperative self-image, and postoperative function than did patients in the spondylolisthesis group (p < 0.001). Sixteen patients in both groups reported that they had back pain often or very often at rest. The standardized physical component scale on the Short Form-36 yielded slightly but significantly better values for the scoliosis group (median, 53.8 points; range, 32 to 61 points) compared with the spondylolisthesis group (median, 53.4 points; range, 27 to 59 points) (p = 0.01).

Conclusions: Patients have good long-term health-related quality of life after surgery for idiopathic scoliosis and spondylolisthesis in adolescence. Patients who have surgery for idiopathic scoliosis are likely to have better long-term outcomes than are patients who have surgery for spondylolisthesis. It is possible that back pain in adolescence may affect quality of life more than spinal deformity does.

Figures in this Article
    Sign In to Your Personal ProfileSign In To Access Full Content
    Not a Subscriber?
    Get online access for 30 days for $35
    New to JBJS?
    Sign up for a full subscription to both the print and online editions
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities, to comment on public articles, or to sign up for alerts.
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities
    Have a subscription to the print edition?
    Current subscribers to The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery in either the print or quarterly DVD formats receive free online access to JBJS.org.
    Forgot your password?
    Enter your username and email address. We'll send you a reminder to the email address on record.

     
    Forgot your username or need assistance? Please contact customer service at subs@jbjs.org. If your access is provided
    by your institution, please contact you librarian or administrator for username and password information. Institutional
    administrators, to reset your institution's master username or password, please contact subs@jbjs.org

    References

    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    CME Activities Associated with This Article
    Submit a Comment
    Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
    Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discretion of JBJS editorial staff.

    * = Required Field
    (if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
    Example: John Doe





    Related Content
    The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery
    JBJS Case Connector
    Topic Collections
    Related Audio and Videos
    PubMed Articles
    Clinical Trials
    Readers of This Also Read...
    JBJS Jobs
    12/31/2013
    S. Carolina - Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Medical Univerity of South Carlonina
    05/03/2012
    California - UCLA/OH Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
    11/15/2013
    Louisiana - Ochsner Health System
    01/22/2014
    Pennsylvania - Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center