0
Scientific Articles   |    
A Modified Risser Grading System Predicts the Curve Acceleration Phase of Female Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
Marie-Lyne Nault, MD, MSc1; Stefan Parent, MD, PhD1; Philippe Phan, MD1; Marjolaine Roy-Beaudry, MSc1; Hubert Labelle, MD1; Michèle Rivard, DSc2
1 Division of Orthopedics, Sainte-Justine Hospital, 3175 Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Montréal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada. E-mail address for M.-L. Nault: timinet@hotmail.com
2 Department of Social and Preventive Medicine and GRIS, University of Montreal, 1430 Boulevard Mont-Royal, Outremont, H2V 4P3 QC, Canada
View Disclosures and Other Information
Disclosure: In support of their research for or preparation of this work, one or more of the authors received, in any one year, outside funding or grants in excess of $10,000 from the Fond de Recherche en Santé du Quebec and MENTOR, a strategic training program of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. In addition, one or more of the authors or a member of his or her immediate family received, in any one year, payments or other benefits in excess of $10,000 or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from commercial entities (Medtronic, DePuy Spine). In addition, one or more of the authors or a member of his or her immediate family received, in any one year, payments or other benefits of less than $10,000 or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity (Biospace)

A commentary by James O. Sanders, MD, is available at www.jbjs.org/commentary and as supplemental material to the online version of this article.
Investigation performed at Sainte-Justine Hospital, Montreal, Canada

Copyright ©2010 American Society for Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2010 May 01;92(5):1073-1081. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.H.01759
5 Recommendations (Recommend) | 3 Comments | Saved by 3 Users Save Case

Abstract

Background: 

The Risser sign can be assessed with the United States method or the European method. The Tanner-Whitehouse method estimates skeletal age on the basis of hand radiography and digital skeletal age. Digital skeletal age scores between 400 and 425 are associated with the beginning of the curve acceleration phase or peak growth velocity in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The first objective of the present study was to evaluate the agreement between the two Risser grading systems. The second objective was to identify which grading system best predicts a digital skeletal age of between 400 and 425. The third objective was to explore a new system that could be used to replace the Risser method.

Methods: 

One hundred female patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were recruited in this cross-sectional descriptive study. Each patient was evaluated with posteroanterior spine and hand radiographs. The Risser sign was measured according to both the United States and European grading systems. Digital skeletal age was calculated, and triradiate cartilage ossification was assessed.

Results: 

With use of kappa statistics, moderate agreement between the United States and European grading systems was seen. Risser stages alone were not good predictors of the curve acceleration phase. A new system with three groups was tested, and the second group (Risser 0 with closed triradiate cartilage and Risser 1) was the best predictor of a digital skeletal age score of between 400 and 425.

Conclusions: 

Two Risser grading systems coexist, and the agreement between them is moderate. No Risser stage was found to be a good clinical landmark for the beginning of the curve acceleration phase of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A new group, Risser 0 with closed triradiate cartilage and Risser 1, was the best predictor of the beginning of the curve acceleration phase. This new system is easy to implement and is based on findings that are available on spine radiographs. It should be used at the first visit and for scoliosis follow-up to assess skeletal maturity and correlation with the curve acceleration phase.

Figures in this Article
    Sign In to Your Personal ProfileSign In To Access Full Content
    Not a Subscriber?
    Get online access for 30 days for $35
    New to JBJS?
    Sign up for a full subscription to both the print and online editions
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities, to comment on public articles, or to sign up for alerts.
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities
    Have a subscription to the print edition?
    Current subscribers to The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery in either the print or quarterly DVD formats receive free online access to JBJS.org.
    Forgot your password?
    Enter your username and email address. We'll send you a reminder to the email address on record.

     
    Forgot your username or need assistance? Please contact customer service at subs@jbjs.org. If your access is provided
    by your institution, please contact you librarian or administrator for username and password information. Institutional
    administrators, to reset your institution's master username or password, please contact subs@jbjs.org

    References

    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    CME Activities Associated with This Article
    Submit a Comment
    Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
    Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discretion of JBJS editorial staff.

    * = Required Field
    (if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
    Example: John Doe





    Related Content
    The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery
    JBJS Case Connector
    Topic Collections
    Related Audio and Videos
    Clinical Trials
    Readers of This Also Read...
    JBJS Jobs
    11/15/2013
    Louisiana - Ochsner Health System
    05/03/2012
    California - UCLA/OH Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
    01/22/2014
    Pennsylvania - Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
    12/31/2013
    S. Carolina - Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Medical Univerity of South Carlonina