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Activity Levels Are Higher After Osteochondral Autograft Transfer Mosaicplasty Than After Microfracture for Articular Cartilage Defects of the KneeA Retrospective Comparative Study
Aaron J. Krych, MD1; Heather W. Harnly, MD2; Scott A. Rodeo, MD3; Riley J. Williams, III, MD3
1 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street S.W., Rochester, MN 55905. E-mail address: krych.aaron@mayo.edu
2 Pediatric Orthopedic Associates, 585 Cranbury Road, East Brunswick, NJ 08816
3 Cartilage Study Group, Institute for Cartilage Repair, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021
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  • Disclosure statement for author(s): PDF

Investigation performed at the Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

A commentary by James L. Carey, MD, MPH, is linked to the online version of this article at jbjs.org.



Disclosure: One or more of the authors received payments or services, either directly or indirectly (i.e., via his or her institution), from a third party in support of an aspect of this work. In addition, one or more of the authors, or his or her institution, has had a financial relationship, in the thirty-six months prior to submission of this work, with an entity in the biomedical arena that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. No author has had any other relationships, or has engaged in any other activities, that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. The complete Disclosures of Potential Conflicts of Interest submitted by authors are always provided with the online version of the article.

Copyright © 2012 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2012 Jun 06;94(11):971-978. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.K.00815
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Abstract

Background: 

There is limited information regarding direct comparisons of the outcome of osteochondral autograft transfer (OAT) mosaicplasty and microfracture for the treatment of isolated articular cartilage defects of the knee. The purpose of this retrospective comparative study was to compare the general health outcomes, knee function, and Marx Activity Rating Scale scores for patients treated with OAT or microfracture for symptomatic chondral defects of the femoral condyles or trochlea. We hypothesized that the patients in the two treatment groups would have similar clinical outcomes at intermediate-term follow-up.

Methods: 

Ninety-six patients with full-thickness cartilage defects of the femoral condyles or trochlea were treated with either OAT mosaicplasty (n = 48) or microfracture (n = 48). The average age of the patients (thirty-two male and sixteen female in each group) at the time of surgery was 29.7 years in the OAT group and 32.5 years in the microfracture group. Patients were prospectively evaluated at baseline and at one, two, three, and five years postoperatively with use of validated clinical outcome measures including the Short Form-36 (SF-36) physical component, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Knee Outcome Survey activities of daily living, and Marx Activity Rating Scale instruments. Comparisons between outcomes before and after treatment or between outcomes after microfracture and mosaicplasty were made with use of two-tailed tests.

Results: 

At the time of the latest follow-up, both groups demonstrated significant increases in SF-36 physical component, Knee Outcome Survey activities of daily living, and IKDC scores compared with baseline. These scores did not differ significantly between the two groups at any of the follow-up time points. However, the OAT group demonstrated a significantly greater improvement in the Marx Activity Rating Scale scores from baseline to the two-year (p = 0.001), three-year (p = 0.03), and five-year (p = 0.02) time points compared with the microfracture group.

Conclusions: 

In the present retrospective comparative study, the hypothesis that patients treated with microfracture or OAT mosaicplasty for symptomatic articular cartilage defects of the femoral condyles or trochlea would have similar clinical outcomes at intermediate-term follow-up was affirmed for general health outcome and for knee function. However, patients treated with OAT mosaicplasty maintained a superior level of athletic activity compared with those treated with microfracture.

Level of Evidence: 

Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

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    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
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