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Current Concepts Review   |    
Current Concepts Review - The Science of Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament*
CYRIL B. FRANK, M.D., F.R.C.S.(C)†, CALGARY, ALBERTA, CANADA; DOUGLAS W. JACKSON, M.D.‡, LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA
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*No benefits in any form have been received or will be received from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article. No funds were received in support of this study.
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 1997 Oct 01;79(10):1556-76
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Extract

Very few subjects in contemporary orthopaedic surgery have evoked as much controversy, thought, and opinion as that of when and how to optimally reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee. Fueled by an annual incidence of acute rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament that has been estimated to be one in 3000 in the American population—approximately 95,000 new injuries each year196—and combined with the fact that more than 50,000 knees that have such an injury are reconstructed annually in the United States alone149, it is not surprising that there has been a virtual explosion of literature on this topic. During the last twenty years, more than 2000 scientific articles on the anterior cruciate ligament have been published, including numerous excellent reviews47,149,151,255,282,294 and textbooks72,89,145. It is a challenging task to attempt to synthesize these sources and to try to resolve the conflicts that are inherent in such a massive body of information. Although many relevant issues will continue to be debated until better basic-science and clinical information becomes available, a number of scientifically supported concepts can be identified within the existing knowledge base. This knowledge can help orthopaedic surgeons to understand the reasons for previous and current successes and failures of reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, and it can help them to plan the care of patients who have an injury of the ligament.
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    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
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