0
Articles   |    
Motion of the Hindfoot after Simulated Arthrodesis*
DONNA J. ASTION, M.D.†; JONATHAN T. DELAND, M.D.‡; JAMES C. OTIS, PH.D.‡; SHARON KENNEALLY, B.S.‡, NEW YORK, N.Y.
View Disclosures and Other Information
Investigation performed at The Hospital for Special Surgery, New York City
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 1997 Feb 01;79(2):241-6
5 Recommendations (Recommend) | 3 Comments | Saved by 3 Users Save Case

Abstract

Arthrodesis of the subtalar joint, triple arthrodesis (involving the subtalar, talonavicular, and calcaneocuboid joints), double arthrodesis (involving the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints), arthrodesis of the talonavicular joint, and arthrodesis of the calcaneocuboid joint were simulated in a cadaver model, and the range of motion of each joint not involved in the simulated arthrodesis was measured with a three-dimensional magnetic space tracking system. The excursion of the posterior tibial tendon was also measured under all of these conditions. We found that any combination of simulated arthrodeses that included the talonavicular joint severely limited the motion of the remaining joints to about 2 degrees and limited the excursion of the posterior tibial tendon to 25 per cent of the preoperative value. Simulated arthrodesis of the calcaneocuboid joint had little effect on the range of motion of the subtalar joint, and it reduced the range of motion of the talonavicular joint to a mean of 67 per cent of the preoperative value; a mean of 73 per cent of the excursion of the posterior tibial tendon was retained. After simulated arthrodesis of the subtalar joint, a mean of 26 per cent of the motion of the talonavicular joint, 56 per cent of the motion of the calcaneocuboid joint, and 46 per cent of the excursion of the posterior tibial tendon was retained.The talonavicular joint is the key joint of the triple joint complex. The talonavicular joint had the greatest range of motion, and simulated arthrodesis of this joint essentially eliminated motion of the other joints of the complex.CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Arthrodesis of any of the joints of the so-called triple joint complex (the subtalar, talonavicular, and calcaneocuboid joints) limits the motion of the remaining, unfused joints. However, clinical estimates of these limitations are imprecise and motion of the individual joints cannot be specifically measured clinically. It is important to be able to measure the limitation of motion of each joint after arthrodesis of the other joints in order to understand the clinical implication of the arthrodesis. Also, it is necessary to ascertain the effect of limiting the motion of these joints on the excursion of the posterior tibial tendon in order to determine when it is appropriate to reconstruct the tendon concomitantly with these arthrodeses.

Figures in this Article
    Sign In to Your Personal ProfileSign In To Access Full Content
    Not a Subscriber?
    Get online access for 30 days for $35
    New to JBJS?
    Sign up for a full subscription to both the print and online editions
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities, to comment on public articles, or to sign up for alerts.
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities
    Have a subscription to the print edition?
    Current subscribers to The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery in either the print or quarterly DVD formats receive free online access to JBJS.org.
    Forgot your password?
    Enter your username and email address. We'll send you a reminder to the email address on record.

     
    Forgot your username or need assistance? Please contact customer service at subs@jbjs.org. If your access is provided
    by your institution, please contact you librarian or administrator for username and password information. Institutional
    administrators, to reset your institution's master username or password, please contact subs@jbjs.org

    References

    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    CME Activities Associated with This Article
    Submit a Comment
    Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
    Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discretion of JBJS editorial staff.

    * = Required Field
    (if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
    Example: John Doe





    Related Content
    The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery
    JBJS Case Connector
    Topic Collections
    Related Audio and Videos
    Clinical Trials
    Readers of This Also Read...
    JBJS Jobs
    04/02/2014
    W. Virginia - Charleston Area Medical Center
    12/31/2013
    S. Carolina - Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Medical Univerity of South Carlonina