0
Articles   |    
An Analysis of Blood Management in Patients Having a Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty*
BENJAMIN E. BIERBAUM, M.D.†, CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS; JOHN J. CALLAGHAN, M.D.‡, IOWA CITY, IOWA; JORGE O. GALANTE, M.D., D.M.SC.§, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS; HARRY E. RUBASH, M.D.#, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS; ROBERT E. TOOMS, M.D.**, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE; RICHARD B. WELCH, M.D.††, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 1999 Jan 01;81(1):2-10
5 Recommendations (Recommend) | 3 Comments | Saved by 3 Users Save Case

Abstract

Three hundred and thirty orthopaedic surgeons in the United States participated in a study of transfusion requirements associated with total joint arthroplasty. A total of 9482 patients (3920 patients who had a total hip replacement and 5562 patients who had a total knee replacement) were evaluated prospectively from September 1996 through June 1997. Of those patients, 4409 (46 percent [57 percent of the patients who had a hip replacement and 39 percent of the patients who had a knee replacement]) had a blood transfusion. Two thousand eight hundred and ninety patients (66 percent) received autologous blood, and 1519 patients (34 percent) received allogenic blood. Ordered logistic regression analysis showed the most important predictors of the transfusion of allogenic blood to be a low baseline hemoglobin level and a lack of predonated autologous blood. Preoperative donation of autologous blood decreases the risk of transfusion of allogenic blood; however, inefficiencies in the procedures for obtaining autologous blood were identified. Sixty-one percent (5741) of the patients had predonated blood for autologous transfusion, but 4464 (45 percent) of the 9920 units of the predonated autologous blood were not used. Primary procedures and revision total knee arthroplasty were associated with the greatest number of wasted autologous units. Of the 5741 patients who had predonated blood, 503 (9 percent) needed a transfusion of allogenic blood. The frequency of allogenic blood transfusion varied with respect to the type of operative procedure (revision total hip arthroplasty and bilateral total knee arthroplasty were associated with the highest prevalence of such transfusions) and with a baseline hemoglobin level of 130 grams per liter or less. Transfusion of allogenic blood was also associated with infection (p = 0.001), fluid overload (p = 0.001), and increased duration of hospitalization (p = 0.01). These latter findings warrant further evaluation in controlled studies.

Figures in this Article
    Sign In to Your Personal ProfileSign In To Access Full Content
    Not a Subscriber?
    Get online access for 30 days for $35
    New to JBJS?
    Sign up for a full subscription to both the print and online editions
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities, to comment on public articles, or to sign up for alerts.
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities
    Have a subscription to the print edition?
    Current subscribers to The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery in either the print or quarterly DVD formats receive free online access to JBJS.org.
    Forgot your password?
    Enter your username and email address. We'll send you a reminder to the email address on record.

     
    Forgot your username or need assistance? Please contact customer service at subs@jbjs.org. If your access is provided
    by your institution, please contact you librarian or administrator for username and password information. Institutional
    administrators, to reset your institution's master username or password, please contact subs@jbjs.org

    References

    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    CME Activities Associated with This Article
    Submit a Comment
    Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
    Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discretion of JBJS editorial staff.

    * = Required Field
    (if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
    Example: John Doe





    Related Content
    The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery
    JBJS Case Connector
    Topic Collections
    Related Audio and Videos
    PubMed Articles
    Clinical Trials
    Readers of This Also Read...
    JBJS Jobs
    04/16/2014
    Georgia - Choice Care Occupational Medicine & Orthopaedics
    04/16/2014
    Ohio - OhioHealth Research and Innovation Institute (OHRI)
    03/19/2014
    Virginia - VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER