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Charnley Total Hip Arthroplasty with Cement Minimum Twenty-five-Year Follow-up*
John J. Callaghan, M.D.†; Jay C. Albright, M.D.†; Devon D. Goetz, M.D.‡; Jason P. Olejniczak, B.A.†; Richard C. Johnston, M.D.†
View Disclosures and Other Information
Investigation performed at Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines, and the University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa
*One or more of the authors has received or will receive benefits for personal or professional use from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article. In addition, benefits have been or will be directed to a research fund, foundation, educational institution, or other nonprofit organization with which one or more of the authors is associated. Funds were received in total or partial support of the research or clinical study presented in this article. The funding source was National Institutes of Health Grant AR43314.
†Department of Orthopaedics, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa 52242. E-mail address for J. J. Callaghan: john-callaghan@uiowa.edu.
‡Des Moines Orthopaedic Associates, 6001 Westown Parkway, West Des Moines, Iowa 50266.

J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2000 Apr 01;82(4):487-487
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Abstract

Background: This report presents the results of the senior author's initial twenty-five-year experience with the use of Charnley total hip arthroplasty with cement. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the long-term results of total hip arthroplasty.

Methods: Between July 1970 and April 1972, the senior author (R. C. J.) performed 330 Charnley total hip replacements with cement using a hand-packing cement technique in 262 patients. Fifty-one patients (sixty-two hips) who were alive at least twenty-five years postoperatively were evaluated from a clinical standpoint with use of a standard-terminology questionnaire. The average age of this group at the time of surgery was fifty-six years (range, thirty-five to seventy-one years) compared with sixty-five years (range, twenty-one to eighty-nine years) for the entire group. All patients were evaluated for radiographic changes at the time of their most recent follow-up. Of the fifty-one patients (sixty-two hips) who were alive at least twenty-five years postoperatively, thirty-one (thirty-six hips) had a follow-up radiograph made at a minimum of twenty-five years after the surgery. The average duration of radiographic follow-up for the fifty-one patients was 22.7 years (range, two to twenty-seven years).

Results: Of the sixty-two hips in the fifty-one patients who were alive at least twenty-five years postoperatively, fourteen (23 percent) had been revised. Three (5 percent) had the revision because of loosening with infection; eleven (18 percent), because of aseptic loosening; and none, because of dislocation. The prevalence of revision due to aseptic loosening of the acetabular component in all 316 hips (excluding those that were lost to follow-up or that were revised for infection or dislocation) was 6 percent (eighteen hips), whereas the prevalence in the fifty-nine hips (excluding the three revised for infection) in the patients who were alive at least twenty-five years after the arthroplasty was 15 percent (nine hips). The prevalence of revision because of aseptic loosening of the femoral component in all 316 hips was 3 percent (nine hips), and the prevalence in the fifty-nine hips in the living patients was 7 percent (four hips). In the group of living patients, osteolysis occurred in Gruen zone 1 or 7 in thirty-three hips and in Gruen zones 2 through 6 in two hips. Ballooning acetabular osteolysis occurred in five hips.

Of the 327 hips for which the outcome was known after a minimum of twenty-five years, 295 (90 percent) had retained the original implants until the patient died or until the most recent follow-up examination. Of the sixty-two hips in patients who lived for at least twenty-five years after the surgery, forty-eight (77 percent) had retained the original prosthesis.

Conclusions: Our follow-up study at twenty-five years following Charnley total hip arthroplasty with cement demonstrates the durability of the results of the procedure. These results should provide a means for comparison with the results of newer cementing techniques as well as those associated with newer cemented and cementless hip designs.

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    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
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