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Improvement of the Bone-Pin Interface Strength in Osteoporotic Bone with Use of Hydroxyapatite-Coated Tapered External-Fixation Pins A Prospective, Randomized Clinical Study of Wrist Fractures
Antonio Moroni, MD; Cesare Faldini, MD; Stefano Marchetti, MD; Mario Manca, MD; Vincenzo Consoli, MD; Sandro Giannini, MD
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Antonio Moroni, MD Cesare Faldini, MD Sandro Giannini, MD Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bologna University, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via G.C. Pupilli, 1, 40136 Bologna, Italy. E-mail address for A. Moroni: a.moroni@ior.it
Stefano Marchetti, MD Mario Manca, MD Vincenzo Consoli, MD
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pisa University, Lungarno Pacinotti 43-44, 56100 Pisa, Italy
No benefits in any form have been received or will be received from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article. No funds were received in support of this study.
Read at the Annual Meetings of the Orthopaedic Research Society and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Orlando, Florida, March 15, 2000.
A commentary is available with the electronic versions of this article, on our web site (www.jbjs.org) and on our CD-ROM (call 781-449-9780, ext. 140, to order).

J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2001 May 01;83(5):717-721
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Abstract

Background: Achieving adequate fixation strength in osteoporotic bone is a challenge. In this study, we examined the use of hydroxyapatite-coated tapered external-fixation pins for the fixation of wrist fractures in patients with osteoporosis.

Methods: Twenty female patients with osteoporosis and a fracture of the wrist were divided into two paired groups and randomized to receive either standard tapered pins or hydroxyapatite-coated tapered pins. Two pins were inserted in the distal part of the radius, two pins were inserted in the second metacarpal, and an external fixation device was mounted. All fixation devices were removed six weeks after surgery.

Results: The mean pin-insertion torque (and standard deviation) was 461 ± 254 Nmm in the group managed with standard pins and 332 ± 176 Nmm in the group managed with hydroxyapatite-coated pins (p = 0.01). The mean pin-extraction torque was 191 ± 155 Nmm in the group managed with standard pins and 600 ± 214 Nmm in the group managed with hydroxyapatite-coated pins (p < 0.0001, power 95%). The mean extraction torque was lower than the corresponding insertion torque at each pin position in the group managed with standard pins (p < 0.05), whereas the mean extraction torque was higher than the corresponding insertion torque at each pin position in the group managed with hydroxyapatite-coated pins (p = 0.001). Two patients managed with standard pins and no patient managed with hydroxyapatite-coated pins had a pin-track infection. Pain during pin removal did not differ between the two groups.

Conclusions: The present study showed that hydroxyapatite-coated tapered external-fixation pins provided improved fixation in the treatment of wrist fractures in patients with osteoporosis.

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    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
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