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Surgical Techniques   |    
Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head with Implantation of Autologous Bone-Marrow Cells
Valérie Gangji, MD1; Jean-Philippe Hauzeur, MD, PhD1
1 Department of Rheumatology and Physical Medicine, Erasme University Hospital, 808 Route de Lennik, 1070 Brussels, Belgium. E-mail address for V. Gangji: vgangji@ulb.ac.be
View Disclosures and Other Information
The authors did not receive grants or outside funding in support of their research or preparation of this manuscript. They did not receive payments or other benefits or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity. No commercial entity paid or directed, or agreed to pay or direct, any benefits to any research fund, foundation, educational institution, or other charitable or nonprofit organization with which the authors are affiliated or associated.
Investigation performed at the Department of Rheumatology and Physical Medicine, Erasme University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium
The original scientific article in which the surgical technique was presented was published in JBJS Vol. 86-A, pp. 1153-1160, June 2004

The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2005 Mar 01;87(1 suppl 1):106-112. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.D.02662
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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Aseptic nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a disorder that can lead to femoral head collapse and the need for total hip replacement. Since osteonecrosis may be a disease of mesenchymal cells or bone cells, the possibility has been raised that bone marrow containing osteogenic precursors implanted into a necrotic lesion of the femoral head may be of benefit in the treatment of this condition. For this reason, we studied the implantation of autologous bone-marrow mononuclear cells in a necrotic lesion of the femoral head to determine the effect on the clinical symptoms and the stage and volume of osteonecrosis.

METHODS:

We studied thirteen patients (eighteen hips) with stage-I or II osteonecrosis of the femoral head, according to the system of the Association Research Circulation Osseous. The hips were allocated to a program of either core decompression (the control group) or core decompression and implantation of autologous bone-marrow mononuclear cells (the bone-marrow-graft group). Both patients and assessors were blind with respect to treatment-group assignment. The primary outcomes studied were safety, clinical symptoms, and disease progression.

RESULTS:

After twenty-four months, there was a significant reduction in pain (p = 0.021) and in joint symptoms measured with the Lequesne index (p = 0.001) and the WOMAC index (p = 0.013) within the bone-marrow-graft group. At twenty-four months, five of the eight hips in the control group had deteriorated to stage III, whereas only one of the ten hips in the bone-marrow-graft group had progressed to this stage. Survival analysis showed a significant difference in the time to collapse between the two groups (p = 0.016). Implantation of bone-marrow mononuclear cells was associated with only minor side effects.

CONCLUSIONS:

Implantation of autologous bone-marrow mononuclear cells appears to be a safe and effective treatment for early stages of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Although the findings of this study are promising, their interpretation is limited because of the small number of patients and the short duration of follow-up. Further study is needed to confirm the results.

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    References

    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
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