0
Scientific Articles   |    
Operative Treatment of Primary Synovial Osteochondromatosis of the Hip
Seung-Jae Lim, MD1; Hye-Won Chung, MD1; Yoon-La Choi, MD1; Young-Wan Moon, MD1; Jai-Gon Seo, MD1; Youn-Soo Park, MD1
1 Departments of Orthopedic Surgery (S.-J.L., Y.-W.M., J.-G.S., and Y.-S.P.), Radiology (H.-W.C.), and Pathology (Y.-L.C.), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710, South Korea. E-mail address for Y.-S. Park: yspark@smc.samsung.co.kr
View Disclosures and Other Information
The authors did not receive grants or outside funding in support of their research for or preparation of this manuscript. They did not receive payments or other benefits or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity. No commercial entity paid or directed, or agreed to pay or direct, any benefits to any research fund, foundation, educational institution, or other charitable or nonprofit organization with which the authors are affiliated or associated.
Investigation performed at Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea

The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2006 Nov 01;88(11):2456-2464. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.F.00268
5 Recommendations (Recommend) | 3 Comments | Saved by 3 Users Save Case

Abstract

Background: Primary synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip, a rare benign condition characterized by multiple intra-articular osteochondral loose bodies and synovial hyperplasia, may result in mechanical symptoms and degenerative arthritis if untreated. The purpose of this study was to report the results of arthrotomy alone or combined with anterior dislocation of the hip to perform synovectomy and removal of loose bodies in patients with this condition.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of twenty-one patients (twenty-one hips) with primary synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip treated with open surgical débridement. On the basis of the extent of extra-articular involvement as seen on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, eight of the twenty-one patients underwent synovectomy and removal of loose bodies following anterior dislocation of the hip and thirteen underwent the same procedure with arthrotomy alone. At a mean of 4.4 years postoperatively, the patients were assessed clinically and radiographically with special attention to disease recurrence, osteoarthritis progression, and surgical complications.

Results: The mean Harris hip score for the entire series of patients improved from 58 points preoperatively to 91 points at the time of the latest follow-up. Eighteen of the twenty-one patients had a good or excellent clinical result, and seventeen patients were satisfied with the result of the surgery. The clinical scores, patient satisfaction scores, and radiographic grades of osteoarthritis at the time of the latest follow-up did not differ significantly between the group treated with dislocation and the group treated without dislocation. Symptomatic disease recurred in two of the thirteen hips treated with arthrotomy alone and in none of the hips that had undergone dislocation. However, the surgical complication rate was higher in the group treated with dislocation than it was in the group treated without dislocation (p = 0.042). While patients with some signs of mild osteoarthritis at the initial procedure had a higher rate of osteoarthritis progression, severe osteoarthritis requiring arthroplasty had developed in only one patient at the time of follow-up.

Conclusions: At a mean of 4.4 years postoperatively, we found that open synovectomy and removal of loose bodies for the treatment of primary synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip is a reliable procedure that can effectively relieve symptoms. Our results also indicated that synovial osteochondromatosis may recur in patients with extensive involvement who are treated with synovectomy alone without dislocation of the hip; however, surgical complications are more likely to occur in patients managed with anterior dislocation of the hip and synovectomy.

Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Figures in this Article
    Sign In to Your Personal ProfileSign In To Access Full Content
    Not a Subscriber?
    Get online access for 30 days for $35
    New to JBJS?
    Sign up for a full subscription to both the print and online editions
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities, to comment on public articles, or to sign up for alerts.
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities
    Have a subscription to the print edition?
    Current subscribers to The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery in either the print or quarterly DVD formats receive free online access to JBJS.org.
    Forgot your password?
    Enter your username and email address. We'll send you a reminder to the email address on record.

     
    Forgot your username or need assistance? Please contact customer service at subs@jbjs.org. If your access is provided
    by your institution, please contact you librarian or administrator for username and password information. Institutional
    administrators, to reset your institution's master username or password, please contact subs@jbjs.org

    References

    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    CME Activities Associated with This Article
    Submit a Comment
    Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
    Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discretion of JBJS editorial staff.

    * = Required Field
    (if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
    Example: John Doe





    Related Content
    The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery
    JBJS Case Connector
    Topic Collections
    Related Audio and Videos
    PubMed Articles
    Clinical Trials
    Readers of This Also Read...
    JBJS Jobs
    04/16/2014
    OH - OhioHealth Research and Innovation Institute (OHRI)
    06/29/2012
    PA - Thomas Jefferson University
    04/16/2014
    GA - Choice Care Occupational Medicine & Orthopaedics
    03/17/2014
    CT - Orthopaedic Foundation