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Scientific Articles   |    
Quality of Life Following Femoral Head-Neck Osteochondroplasty for Femoroacetabular Impingement
Paul E. Beaulé, MD, FRCSC1; Michel J. Le Duff, MA2; Edward Zaragoza, MD3
1 Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Suite 5004, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L6, Canada
2 Joint Replacement Institute, Orthopaedic Hospital, 2400 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, CA 90007
3 Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California at Los Angeles, 1250 16th Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404
View Disclosures and Other Information
Disclosure: The authors did not receive any outside funding or grants in support of their research for or preparation of this work. One or more of the authors, or a member of his or her immediate family, received, in any one year, payments or other benefits in excess of $10,000 or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity (Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, Tennessee). No commercial entity paid or directed, or agreed to pay or direct, any benefits to any research fund, foundation, division, center, clinical practice, or other charitable or nonprofit organization with which the authors, or a member of their immediate families, are affiliated or associated.
Investigation performed at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA/Orthopaedic Hospital, Los Angeles, California, and the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2007 Apr 01;89(4):773-779. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.F.00681
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Abstract

Background: Femoroacetabular impingement has been recently described as a common cause of hip pain and labral tears in young adults. We evaluated the early clinical results and quality of life after osteochondroplasty of the femoral head-neck junction for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement.

Methods: Thirty-seven hips in thirty-four patients with persistent hip pain and a mean age of 40.5 years underwent surgical dislocation of the hip and osteochondroplasty of the femoral head-neck junction for the treatment of camtype femoroacetabular impingement. All of the patients had had preoperative evidence of pathological changes in the labrum on imaging. The clinical course and the quality of life were assessed postoperatively.

Results: The mean score on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) increased from 61.2 points preoperatively to 81.4 points at a mean of 3.1 years postoperatively (p < 0.001), the mean University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score increased from 4.8 to 7.5 points (p < 0.001), the mean Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical component score increased from 37.3 to 45.6 points (p < 0.001), and the mean SF-12 mental component score increased from 46.4 to 51.2 points (p = 0.031). None of the hips underwent additional reconstructive surgery. There were no cases of osteonecrosis. Nine patients underwent screw removal from the greater trochanter because of persistent bursitis. Six of the thirty-four patients were dissatisfied with the outcome.

Conclusions: Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement is associated with insufficient concavity at the anterolateral head-neck junction and with pathological changes in the labrum. Osteochondroplasty of the femoral head-neck junction following surgical dislocation of the hip joint is safe and effective and can provide a significant improvement in the overall quality of life of most patients.

Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

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    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
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