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Scientific Articles   |    
Hindfoot Endoscopy for Posterior Ankle Impingement
P.E. Scholten, MD1; I.N. Sierevelt, MSc2; C.N. van Dijk, MD, PhD2
1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kliniek Klein Rosendael, Rosendaalselaan 30, 6891 DG Rozendaal, The Netherlands. E-mail address: pscholten@medinova.com
2 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam, The Netherlands. E-mail address for I.N. Sierevelt: i.n.sierevelt@amc.uva.nl. E-mail address for C.N. van Dijk: c.n.vandijk@amc.uva.nl
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Disclosure: The authors did not receive any outside funding or grants in support of their research for or preparation of this work. Neither they nor a member of their immediate families received payments or other benefits or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity. No commercial entity paid or directed, or agreed to pay or direct, any benefits to any research fund, foundation, division, center, clinical practice, or other charitable or nonprofit organization with which the authors, or a member of their immediate families, are affiliated or associated.
A video supplement to this article will be available from the Video Journal of Orthopaedics. A video clip will be available at the JBJS web site, www.jbjs.org. The Video Journal of Orthopaedics can be contacted at (805) 962-3410, web site: www.vjortho.com.
Investigation performed at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2008 Dec 01;90(12):2665-2672. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.F.00188
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Abstract

Background: The surgical treatment of posterior ankle impingement is associated with a high rate of complications and a substantial time to recover. An endoscopic approach to the posterior ankle (hindfoot endoscopy) may lack these disadvantages. We hypothesized that hindfoot endoscopy causes less morbidity and facilitates a quick recovery compared with open surgery.

Methods: Fifty-five consecutive patients with posterior ankle impingement were treated with an endoscopic removal of bone fragments and/or scar tissue. The symptoms were caused by trauma (65%) or overuse (35%). All patients were enrolled in a prospective protocol. At baseline, the age, sex, work and sports activities, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores, and preinjury Tegner scores were determined for all patients. At the time of follow-up, AOFAS hindfoot scores and Tegner scores were assessed and the time to return to work and sports activities was determined. Complications were recorded. Patients scored the overall result as poor, fair, good, or excellent by means of a 4-point Likert scale.

Results: The median duration of follow-up was thirty-six months, and no patient was lost to follow-up. The median AOFAS hindfoot score increased from 75 points preoperatively to 90 points at the time of final follow-up. The median time to return to work and sports activities was two and eight weeks, respectively. At the time of follow-up, patients in the overuse group were more satisfied than those in the posttraumatic group, and the AOFAS hindfoot scores were higher in patients in the overuse group (median, 100 points) compared with patients in the posttraumatic group (median, 90 points). A complication occurred in one patient who had a temporary loss of sensation of the posteromedial aspect of the heel.

Conclusions: The outcome after endoscopic treatment of posterior ankle impingement compares favorably with the results of open surgery reported in the literature. Hindfoot endoscopy appears to cause less morbidity than open ankle surgery and facilitates a quick recovery. Patients treated for posterior ankle impingement caused by overuse have better results than those treated following trauma.

Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

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    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
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