0
Scientific Articles   |    
Long-Term Outcome After Surgical Treatment of Unresolved Osgood-Schlatter Disease in Young Men
Harri K. Pihlajamäki, MD, PhD1; Ville M. Mattila, MD, PhD1; Mickael Parviainen, MD1; Martti J. Kiuru, MD, PhD, MSc2; Tuomo I. Visuri, MD, PhD1
1 Research Department, Centre for Military Medicine, P.O. Box 50, FIN 00301 Helsinki, Finland. E-mail address for H.K. Pihlajamäki: harri.pihlajamaki@helsinki.fi. E-mail address for V.M. Mattila: ville.mattila@uta.fi. E-mail address for M. Parviainen: mikko.parviainen@orton.fi. E-mail address for T.I. Visuri: tuomo.visuri@helsinki.fi
2 Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Topeliuksenkatu 5, FIN 00029 Helsinki, Finland. E-mail address: martti.kiuru@terveystalo.com
View Disclosures and Other Information
Disclosure: The authors did not receive any outside funding or grants in support of their research for or preparation of this work. Neither they nor a member of their immediate families received payments or other benefits or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity. No commercial entity paid or directed, or agreed to pay or direct, any benefits to any research fund, foundation, division, center, clinical practice, or other charitable or nonprofit organization with which the authors, or a member of their immediate families, are affiliated or associated.
Investigation performed at the Research Department, Centre for Military Medicine; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Central Military Hospital; and Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland

The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2009 Oct 01;91(10):2350-2358. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.H.01796
5 Recommendations (Recommend) | 3 Comments | Saved by 3 Users Save Case

Abstract

Background: Surgical treatment of Osgood-Schlatter disease is occasionally warranted, but its long-term prognosis remains poorly investigated. We studied the rate of occurrence of surgical treatment of unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease as well as the clinical course, radiographic characteristics, and long-term outcomes after that treatment in a large population of military recruits.

Methods: During a thirteen-year period, 178 consecutive recruits underwent surgery for unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease, and 107 of them (117 knees) who met the inclusion criteria participated in a follow-up examination. We obtained data from the original medical records and radiographs as well as follow-up information from physical and radiographic examinations, interviews, and questionnaires to determine functional outcomes.

Results: The rate of occurrence of surgically treated unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease was forty-two per 100,000 military recruits. The median age at the onset of symptoms was fifteen years. After a median duration of follow-up of ten years after the surgery, ninety-three patients (87%) reported no restrictions in everyday activities or at work and eighty (75%) had returned to their preoperative level of sports activity. The median modified Kujala score was 95 points, and the median visual analog score for pain was 7 mm. Forty-one patients (38%) reported a complete absence of pain when kneeling. Six patients had experienced minor postoperative complications, and two had undergone a reoperation for the treatment of the Osgood-Schlatter disease. After resection, the mean tibial tuberosity thickness decreased by 47%. The mean Insall-Salvati index was 1.0 preoperatively and 1.09 postoperatively (p = 0.003), and the corresponding mean Blackburne-Peel indexes were 0.85 and 0.95 (p = 0.003). With the numbers studied, the symptom duration, surgical methods, and radiographic indexes were not found to have an effect on the outcome of surgery.

Conclusions: In the great majority of young adults, the functional outcome of surgical treatment of unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease is excellent or good, the residual pain intensity is low, and postoperative complications or subsequent reoperations are rare.

Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Figures in this Article
    Sign In to Your Personal ProfileSign In To Access Full Content
    Not a Subscriber?
    Get online access for 30 days for $35
    New to JBJS?
    Sign up for a full subscription to both the print and online editions
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities, to comment on public articles, or to sign up for alerts.
    Register for a FREE limited account to get full access to all CME activities
    Have a subscription to the print edition?
    Current subscribers to The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery in either the print or quarterly DVD formats receive free online access to JBJS.org.
    Forgot your password?
    Enter your username and email address. We'll send you a reminder to the email address on record.

     
    Forgot your username or need assistance? Please contact customer service at subs@jbjs.org. If your access is provided
    by your institution, please contact you librarian or administrator for username and password information. Institutional
    administrators, to reset your institution's master username or password, please contact subs@jbjs.org

    References

    Accreditation Statement
    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    CME Activities Associated with This Article
    Submit a Comment
    Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
    Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discretion of JBJS editorial staff.

    * = Required Field
    (if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
    Example: John Doe





    Related Content
    The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery
    JBJS Case Connector
    Topic Collections
    Related Audio and Videos
    Clinical Trials
    Readers of This Also Read...
    JBJS Jobs
    04/02/2014
    W. Virginia - Charleston Area Medical Center
    12/31/2013
    S. Carolina - Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Medical Univerity of South Carlonina
    02/28/2014
    District of Columbia (DC) - Children's National Medical Center
    12/04/2013
    New York - Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai