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Section VI: Malalignment and Ligamentous Injury   |    
Navigated Long-Bone Fracture Reduction
David M. Kahler, MD1
1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Box 800159, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0159. E-mail address: Dmk7y@virginia.edu
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Disclosure: In support of his research for or preparation of this work, the author received, in any one year, outside funding or grants in excess of $10,000 from BrainLAB. Neither he nor a member of his immediate family received payments or other benefits or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity. No commercial entity paid or directed, or agreed to pay or direct, any benefits to any research fund, foundation, division, center, clinical practice, or other charitable or nonprofit organization with which the author, or a member of his immediate family, is affiliated or associated.

The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.
J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2009 Feb 01;91(Supplement 1):102-107. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.H.01286
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Abstract

The first computer-assisted orthopaedic trauma procedures were limited to navigated drill-guide applications, in which the computer was used to predict the trajectory of the drill guide relative to stored radiographic images. By 2003, software for fracture reduction was commercially available. The ability to perform a minimally invasive fracture reduction with the aid of stored images, combined with navigated insertion of internal fixation, has long been considered the highest achievement in image-guided fracture surgery. It is now possible to apply computer-assisted techniques to all fractures that have traditionally been treated with the aid of intraoperative fluoroscopic control. Less-invasive fixation of long-bone fractures is often complicated by malrotation or shortening of the injured extremity, sometimes requiring reoperation. Recent developments in computer-assisted surgery now allow the orthopaedic surgeon to precisely match the anatomy of the injured extremity to that of the uninjured limb with respect to length and rotational alignment. This is particularly important in comminuted fractures, for which there are no anatomic clues to guide accurate reduction, and in the correction of malreduced fractures. Although computer-assisted technology is now readily available, it has not yet found widespread acceptance in the orthopaedic trauma community. New software workflows (i.e., the step-by-step progression through various screens in the software program during a computer-guided procedure) specific to individual procedures and implants may hasten adoption of these techniques.

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    These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
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