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Scientific Articles  |  April 02, 2014

Scientific Articles  |  March 05, 2014
Scientific Articles  |  March 05, 2014
Figures  
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Schematic representation of the proximal aspect of the ulna demonstrating the flat spot (F), the total height of the coronoid (H), 40% of the height of the coronoid (C), the height of the olecranon tip equivalent to 40% of the coronoid height (O), the total length of the olecranon articular surface (L), and the amount of olecranon articular surface resected by the olecranon osteotomy (x). The solid red and blue lines represent the coronoid and olecranon osteotomies, respectively, that were performed in this study. The dashed white line represents the orientation of the osteotomy used by Bell et al.22. For the same amount of articular surface resection (x), that osteotomy requires resection of an additional portion of the proximal aspect of the ulna compared with our osteotomy (as indicated by the area between the dashed white line and the blue line).

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 2

    Fig. 2-A Extended EDC splitting approach performed by detaching the anterior half of the EDC as well as the extensor carpi radialis brevis from the lateral epicondyle (*). The extensor carpi radialis longus and the brachioradialis were also detached from the supracondylar ridge (+). The radial head (r), capitellum (c), and coronoid tip (u) are visualized. Fig. 2-B The blue highlighted area represents the distal humeral exposure obtained. Fig. 2-C The red highlighted area represents the coronoid process exposure obtained. In the present study, the extended modified Kocher approach offered similar visualization of the coronoid process and distal aspect of the humerus.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    A lateral three-dimensional CT scan of the elbow depicting the isometric origin of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament (white circle) and its distal insertion on the crista supinatoris of the ulna (arrow).

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    The deformity of the distal part of the humerus was evaluated with three-dimensional computer bone models. The proximal site of the affected humerus was superimposed onto the mirror image of the corresponding part on the contralateral, normal side. The deformity of the distal part of the humerus was quantified three-dimensionally.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Comparison of the mean of actual baseline QuickDASH scores and recalled baseline QuickDASH scores for each time point. The three-month time point was the only time point to show a significant difference between actual baseline and recalled baseline QuickDASH scores (p= 0.001).

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Figs. 1-A through 1-F The safe sequence of arthroscopic elbow capsulectomy. Olec = olecranon, Fossa = olecranon fossa, and Troch = trochlea. Fig. 1-A Three-dimensional surface rendering computed tomography (CT) scan showing the arthroscopic field of view (circle). Fig. 1-B Step 1: Get In and Establish a View. This arthroscopic view of the area indicated by the circle in Figure 1-A reveals the tip of the olecranon just barely detectable within the surrounding scar tissue. Anatomic landmarks and their spatial orientation are confirmed. Fig. 1-C Step 2: Create a Space in Which to Work. After removing scar tissue, stripping the scar tissue and capsule off the bone, and inserting a retractor to elevate the soft tissues, a much larger view is now possible in which the olecranon can be seen impinging against the marginal osteophyte on the trochlea. Above this is scar tissue covering the floor of the olecranon fossa. Fig. 1-D Sagittal reconstruction of a CT scan showing posterior osteophytes. Figs. 1-E and 1-F Step 3: Bone Removal. Osteophytes are removed from the margin of the trochlea, the rim and floor of the olecranon fossa, and the olecranon. (By permission of the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. All rights reserved.)

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Diagram of the literature search results. Four hundred and sixty unique articles were identified through MEDLINE (n = 338) and Embase (n = 363). We excluded case studies with five patients or fewer, review articles, articles addressing radial head arthroplasty rather than ulnar humeral arthroplasty, those focused on resection arthroplasty or tumor cases, and articles that were biomechanical in nature. Screening of title, abstract, and publication type resulted in ninety-four articles, with seventy-two articles remaining after review of the full article.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 2

    Epiphysiolysis (Little Leaguer’s elbow). A coronal STIR image of the right elbow shows diffuse high signal intensity within the medial epicondyle, consistent with epiphysiolysis from repetitive valgus stress to the elbow (arrow). Note the normal UCL (arrowhead).

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Type-I allograft-prosthetic composite. (Reproduced with permission of Matt Morrey, MD.)

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Figs. 1-A and 1-B An eighteen-year-old woman with a partial articular fracture without a block to motion. Fig. 1-A Anteroposterior radiograph made at the time of presentation. Fig. 1-B Anteroposterior radiograph made one year after nonoperative treatment. The patient had full range of motion and excellent function.

    Figure Description
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