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Scientific Articles  |  April 16, 2014

Scientific Articles  |  April 16, 2014
Scientific Articles  |  April 16, 2014
Figures  
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Dissection photographs presenting the ligamentous bands (tagged with suture) of the superficial layer of the deltoid ligament in a left ankle. Four ligamentous bands composed the superficial layer of the deltoid ligament in this specimen and included the tibionavicular, tibiospring, tibiocalcaneal, and superficial posterior tibiotalar ligaments. Fig.1-A Anteromedial view of the deltoid ligament with the tibionavicular ligament grasped. Fig.1-B Medial view of the deltoid ligament with the tibiospring ligament grasped. Fig.1-C Medial view of the deltoid ligament with the tibiocalcaneal ligament grasped. Fig. 1-D Posteromedial view of the deltoid ligament with the superficial posterior tibiotalar ligament in view.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    This clinical photograph demonstrates the posture and position of the feet during image acquisition of the coronal (Fig. 1-A) and sagittal (Fig. 1-B) views using the Philips Healthcare MultiDiagnost Eleva scanner. Patients are provided with table hand holds for stability and a secure Velcro strap (Velcro USA, Manchester, New Hampshire) for safety (not shown). A wooden platform is placed on top of the plywood and footrest to remove obstacles from the image acquisition.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Surgical field showing the proper glenoid cut.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Drawing of the ligamentous anatomy of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis with anterior, posterior, lateral, and axial cut views. AITFL = anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, IOL = interosseous ligament, PITFL = posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and ITL = inferior transverse ligament. (Reproduced, with permission, from: Davidovitch RI, Egol KA. Ankle fractures. In: Bucholz RW, Heckman JD, Court-Brown CM, Tornetta P, editors. Rockwood and Green’s fractures in adults. 7th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2010. Figure 57-12.)

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Adjusted mean AOFAS scores of the osteoarthritis (OA), posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) groups.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    RCTs published in the United States according to year, showing the proportion of those reporting race and/or ethnicity.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    The T-SPOTT tibialis posterior tendon transfer technique. The complete tibialis posterior tendon is released at its insertion on the navicular bone through a medial approach (first panel). The tendon is pulled out and split in half, and the two halves are tagged with number-1 Vicryl sutures (second panel). Both tendon halves are transferred through the interosseous membrane behind the tibia to the extensor compartment (third panel). After exposing the tibialis anterior tendon, forceps are driven proximally through the tendon sheath beneath the retinaculum extensorum to the anterior approach and one half of the tibialis posterior tendon is grasped and transferred distally (fourth panel). Another approach is used at the lateral aspect of the foot to expose the peroneal tendons and the long toe extensors; the tendon sheath of the long toe extensors is then incised and the forceps are driven proximally within the sheath to the anterior approach at the distal aspect of the leg, where the second half of the tibialis posterior tendon is grasped and then transferred distally (fifth panel). After the transfer, one of the halves of the tibialis posterior tendon is sutured to the tibialis anterior tendon at the medial border of the foot, and the other half is sutured to the peroneus brevis or tertius tendon at the lateral aspect of the foot for balancing (sixth panel). (Reproduced, with permission, from: Wiesel SW. Operative techniques in orthopaedic surgery. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2012. http://lww.com.)

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    A specimen mounted in the testing machine for cyclic axial loading with simultaneous tendon loading while key osseous relationships were monitored. The two outer clinometers attached to the talus and the first metatarsal monitored their relative angulation in the sagittal plane. The two inner clinometers in the photograph were attached to the talus and the navicular for measurement of their relative angulation in the coronal plane. Axial load was applied through the tibia, and a proportionally smaller load was applied to the fibula with use of a spring, allowing fibular motion during specimen loading.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Deltoid branches of the medial aspect of the talus (arrow) insert below the medial articular facet of the talus (line) (Fig. 1-A). Measurement of medial injury referenced the medial articular facet on the preoperative CT (Fig. 1-B, arrow), and the medial cut was noted on the postoperative CT at the same coronal cut (Fig. 1-C). Overlay of the two images (Fig. 1-D) showed the measurement to be above (positive) or below (negative) the medial articular facet. In this example, a value of −6.00 mm was measured.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    A 3.5-cm longitudinal incision is made over the posterior part of the lateral aspect of the hindfoot along the lateral border of the Achilles tendon. The anatomical plate is introduced through the incision in a subcutaneous tunnel. The red line indicates the minimally invasive longitudinal approach. 1 = the superficial peroneal nerve, and 2 = the sural nerve.

    Figure Description
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