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Current Concepts Review  |  February 19, 2014

Figures  
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    CONSORT28 (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) flow diagram.

    Figure Description
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    Mean SF-12 PCS scores according to diagnosis. The superscripted numbers indicate the reference sources. The striped bar represents tibial nonunion, and the solid white bar represents the mean across the noninstitutionalized United States population. The medical conditions above the dashed line were associated with significantly (p < 0.05) better physical health compared with tibial shaft nonunion.

    Figure Description
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    The tendon’s hierarchical structure begins at the molecular level with tropocollagen1. Approximately five tropocollagen molecules form a microfibril, which then aggregate to create a subfibril1. Several subfibrils form a single fibril. Multiple fibrils form a tendon fascicle, and fascicles, separated by the endotenon, join to form the macroscopic tendon1. Tendon fibroblasts, or tenocytes, are found on collagen fibers allowing for the regulation of the extracellular environment in response to chemical and mechanical cues. (Reproduced, with permission of Elsevier, from: Silver FH, Freeman JW, Seehra GP. Collagen self-assembly and the development of tendon mechanical properties. J. Biomech. 2003 Oct;36(10):1529-33, Copyright 2003; and Wang JH. Mechanobiology of tendon. J Biomech. 2006;39(9):1563-82, Copyright 2006.)

    Figure Description
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    Flow diagram depicting the stages of the double free muscle transfer (FMT) procedure. The numbers in parentheses indicate how many patients underwent each particular procedure. SSN = suprascapular nerve, PN = phrenic nerve, PD = posterior division of upper trunk, ICN = intercostal nerve, PIP = proximal interphalangeal nerve, and DIP = distal interphalangeal nerve.

    Figure Description
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    The top panel shows an apparatus (A) for making a suture loop. A single loop (B) is wrapped around a 30-mm-diameter rod (C) and an adjacent 3-mm-diameter rod (D). The purpose of adding the small rod is to permit easy removal of the suture loop from the large rod after withdrawal of the small rod. A 1-kg weight (E) is tied to the knot. The bottom panel illustrates a 4-throw square knot and a TSOL knot.

    Figure Description
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    A scatterplot showing the residual femoral abduction angle compared with the residual limb ratio, in which a negative femoral axis angle indicates abduction.

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    The experimental setup for measurement of friction between the tendon and proximal pulley. The weight was 500 g.

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    Flow diagram showing the identification of potentially applicable studies and evaluation of their eligibility.

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    Initial and twelve-month outcome scores for patients with (PD) and those without (NPD) a psychological diagnosis undergoing a total knee arthroplasty.

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    Figs. 1-A through 1-E Overview of the active mobilization protocol, the two passive mobilization protocols, and the two experimental passive mobilization models used in the present study. The bottom row shows a typical example of absolute hand flexor tendon excursions, surrounding tissue motion, and relative tendon excursions obtained during the corresponding mobilization protocols and experimental models shown in the top and middle rows. Fig. 1-A The active four-finger mobilization protocol. Fig. 1-B The passive four-finger mobilization protocol. Fig. 1-C The modified Kleinert mobilization protocol. Fig. 1-D The experimental modified Kleinert flexion mobilization model. Fig. 1-E The experimental modified Kleinert extension mobilization model.

    Figure Description
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