0
Scientific Articles  |  April 16, 2014

The Orthopaedic Forum  |  April 02, 2014
Scientific Articles  |  April 02, 2014
Figures  
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    CONSORT flow diagram.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    RCTs published in the United States according to year, showing the proportion of those reporting race and/or ethnicity.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    The T-SPOTT tibialis posterior tendon transfer technique. The complete tibialis posterior tendon is released at its insertion on the navicular bone through a medial approach (first panel). The tendon is pulled out and split in half, and the two halves are tagged with number-1 Vicryl sutures (second panel). Both tendon halves are transferred through the interosseous membrane behind the tibia to the extensor compartment (third panel). After exposing the tibialis anterior tendon, forceps are driven proximally through the tendon sheath beneath the retinaculum extensorum to the anterior approach and one half of the tibialis posterior tendon is grasped and transferred distally (fourth panel). Another approach is used at the lateral aspect of the foot to expose the peroneal tendons and the long toe extensors; the tendon sheath of the long toe extensors is then incised and the forceps are driven proximally within the sheath to the anterior approach at the distal aspect of the leg, where the second half of the tibialis posterior tendon is grasped and then transferred distally (fifth panel). After the transfer, one of the halves of the tibialis posterior tendon is sutured to the tibialis anterior tendon at the medial border of the foot, and the other half is sutured to the peroneus brevis or tertius tendon at the lateral aspect of the foot for balancing (sixth panel). (Reproduced, with permission, from: Wiesel SW. Operative techniques in orthopaedic surgery. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2012. http://lww.com.)

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Summary of the reviewed outcome assessment systems. 1 = purely functional outcome scores; 2 = outcome scores evaluating function, aesthetics, and subjective aspects; 3 = structured outcome criteria systems; * = essential item based on consensus; † = content validity based on consensus and the number of essential items given; and n.a. = not available.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Parent reports of patient function differed between medical malpractice litigation and non-litigation cohorts, matched on age and injury severity, for children with all types of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (Figs. 1-A, 1-B, and 1-C) and children with specifically upper plexus injuries (Raimondi grade 4 or 5) (Figs. 1-D and 1-E). Error bars indicate the interquartile range.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Flowchart diagram for the study. When a patient was consulted for surgery, he or she was evaluated with the manual muscle test, modified Rancho scale, forced vital capacity, end tidal CO2, and radiographic parameters. At the time of the final evaluation, the same evaluations were performed and the Muscular Dystrophy Spine Questionnaire (MDSQ) was added.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Schematic workflow for a microarray GWAS. (1) When identifying study populations, note that a GWAS has greater power to detect significant associations when large populations are included in the analysis. (2) DNA from each sample is analyzed on microarrays that test millions of genome-wide SNPs. SNP genotypes are determined by the fluorescent color of the microarray during signal detection. (3) SNP alleles are counted in the case and control populations. Each sample has two possible alleles for each SNP site (shown in red), one allele inherited from each parent. Sites without SNP mutations are shown in black. (4) Statistical analysis in this GWAS uses case-control chi-square contingency tables. SNP1 is significantly associated with the disease (p < 0.05). (5) Association results are plotted genome-wide, from the first SNP of chromosome 1 to the last SNP of chromosome X; this is called a Manhattan plot. The negative of the logarithm of the p value, –log(p), for each SNP is plotted on the y axis. Peaks in the plot represent highly significant p values near candidate genes. The horizontal dashed line marks the –log(p) value representing Bonferroni-corrected genome-wide significance. Chromosomes are represented with alternating colors.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Growth chart comparison of TT-TG (tibial tubercle-trochlear groove) distance (in millimeters) with chronologic age (in years) in the normal group (those without patellar instability) for the 50th, 75th, 90th, 95th, and 97th percentiles.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 2

    A flowchart of the thirty hips that underwent late reconstructive surgery, showing the long-term (fifty-year) radiographic outcome in relation to indications for surgery and short-term results (one year after surgery) and presented as number of hips.

    Figure Description
  • Anchor for JumpFig. 1

    Number of cast saw injuries by month, 2010 through 2012. The number of injuries per month is represented by the line. The pre-intervention period depicts the spike in injuries observed during October 2009.

    Figure Description
More from Pediatrics
Scientific Articles  |     
T. Dreher, MD; S.I. Wolf, PhD; D. Heitzmann, MSc; C. Fremd; M.C. Klotz, MD; W. Wenz, MD
Scientific Articles  |     
Robert R. Dijkman, MD; Christianne A. van Nieuwenhoven, MD, PhD; Ruud W. Selles, PhD; Steven E.R. Hovius, MD, PhD
Commentary and Perspective  |     
Michael S. Aronow, MD
Commentary and Perspective  |     
Marybeth Ezaki, MD
Commentary and Perspective  |     
Joshua M. Abzug, MD
Scientific Articles  |     
Emily A. Eismann, MS; Andrea Bauer, MD; Scott H. Kozin, MD; Emily Louden, MPH; Roger Cornwall, MD
Scientific Articles  |     
Kyung Soo Suk, MD; Byung Ho Lee, MD; Hwan Mo Lee, MD; Seong Hwan Moon, MD; Young Chul Choi, MD; Dong Eun Shin, MD; Jung Won Ha, MD; Kwang Min Song, MD; Hak Sun Kim, MD
04/02/2014
W. Virginia - Charleston Area Medical Center
12/04/2013
New York - Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
12/31/2013
S. Carolina - Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Medical Univerity of South Carlonina
02/28/2014
District of Columbia (DC) - Children's National Medical Center
New from JBJS
Subscribe to this Corridor to get access to:
Highlight Newsletter, providing summaries of literature from top orthopaedic publications and discussion by experts
JBJS Essential Surgical Techniques content with step-by-step articles, images and video outlining the surgical techniques
JBJS Case Connector content for highlighting patterns and trends between patient conditions
   Already own this Corridor? Sign In
Full access to the following articles is included with the purchase of the above Corridor:
Results from JBJS Case Connector:

February 26, 2014
Sanjeev S. Madan, Rajan Maheshwari
February 26, 2014
Marc Swiontkowski, Lloyd Resnick
February 12, 2014
Khodamorad Jamshidi, Mehdi Rezaee, Haniyeh Kamyab
Results from JBJS Essential Surgical Techniques:

December 24, 2013
Chang-Wug Oh, Joon-Woo Kim, Seung-Gil Baek et al.
October 9, 2013
Ting-Ming Wang, Kuan-Wen Wu, Shier-Chieg Huang et al.
July 10, 2013
Andrew D. Duckworth, Margaret M. McQueen