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Figures  
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    Parent reports of patient function differed between medical malpractice litigation and non-litigation cohorts, matched on age and injury severity, for children with all types of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (Figs. 1-A, 1-B, and 1-C) and children with specifically upper plexus injuries (Raimondi grade 4 or 5) (Figs. 1-D and 1-E). Error bars indicate the interquartile range.

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    Figs. 1-A through 1-D Features of slide-based disclosure data.

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    Mean number of authors per publication in JBJS-A and JBJS-B original articles.

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    Number of disclosures per faculty member for the 439 faculty members who disclosed a conflict of interest. No conflicts of interest were disclosed by 1050 faculty members.

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    The relationship of relative claim payment to claim frequency for twelve claim types. The horizontal axis shows the number of claims of the indicated type divided by the total number of claims (464) expressed as a percentage. The vertical axis shows the total payment dollars for claims of the indicated type divided by the total payment for all claim types ($17,917,614) expressed as a percentage. Points above the line of identity indicate impact factors greater than 1 (i.e., those claim types where the payment is disproportionally high with respect to the claim frequency).

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    Figs. 1-A, 1-B, and 1-C Photographs of the cadaver of Charles Lowell. (Courtesy of the Warren Anatomical Museum in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.) Fig. 1-A Anterior view of the pelvis and proximal femora demonstrating heterotopic bone obscuring the view of the left obturator foramen and acetabulum.

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    Percentage of rejected studies published over time.

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    Theoretical distribution of randomized clinical trial results as data accumulate. (Reproduced, with permission, from: Montori VM, Devereaux PJ, Schunemann HJ, Mead MO, Cook DJ, Guyatt GH. Randomized trials stopped early for benefit. In: Guyatt GH, Rennie D, Mead MO, Cook DJ, editors. Users’ guides to the medical literature: a manual for evidence-based clinical practice. 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2008. p 155. Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.)

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    A screenshot of a Google Reader table of contents for “hip surgery” articles from the RSS feeds distributed by Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research and The Journal of Arthroplasty.

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