Salvage of a Recurrently Dislocating Total Hip Prosthesis with Use of a Constrained Acetabular Component. A Retrospective Analysis of Fifty-six Cases*
DEVON D. GOETZ, M.D.†, DES MOINES; WILLIAM N. CAPELLO, M.D.‡, INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA; JOHN J. CALLAGHAN, M.D.§; THOMAS D. BROWN, PH.D.§, IOWA CITY; RICHARD C. JOHNSTON, M.D.†, DES MOINES, IOWA

Abstract

Fifty-six constrained acetabular components were placed, between April 1988 and February 1993, in fifty-five patients who had had recurrent dislocations (average, six dislocations; range, two to twenty dislocations) of the femoral component after a previous total hip arthroplasty. All patients had additional factors contributing to the instability of the implant, including absence or disruption of the abductor mechanism, poor health, mental retardation, confusion, and Alzheimer disease. One patient was lost to follow-up. The remaining patients were followed clinically for a minimum of three years (average, sixty-four months; range, thirty-seven to ninety-seven months) or until the time of death. During the follow-up interval, only two (4 per cent) of the fifty-five patients had a subsequent dislocation. The use of this type of component should be considered for patients who have recurrent dislocation if other treatment modalities are unlikely to be effective.

Footnotes

  • *One or more of the authors has received or will receive benefits for personal or professional use from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article. In addition, benefits have been or will be directed to a research fund or foundation, educational institution, or other non-profit organization with which one or more of the authors is associated. In addition, funds were received in total or partial support of the research or clinical study presented in this article. The funding source was National Institutes of Health Grant AR43314.

  • Investigation performed at Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines; Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis; and the University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City


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