Parathyroid Hormone 1-84 Accelerates Fracture-Healing in Pubic Bones of Elderly Osteoporotic Women
Peter Peichl, MD; Lukas A. Holzer, MD; Richard Maier, MD; Gerold Holzer, MD

Abstract

Background: Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been shown to increase bone mineral density and to reduce the rate of fractures in patients with osteoporosis and also to improve fracture-healing. The purpose of the present prospective, randomized, controlled study was to evaluate the effect of PTH 1-84 on the course of pelvic fracture-healing and functional outcome in postmenopausal women.

Methods: Sixty-five patients had a dual x-ray absorptiometry scan, radiographs, and a computed tomography scan to document pelvic fractures. Twenty-one patients received a once-daily injection of 100 μg of PTH 1-84 starting within two days after admission to the hospital, and forty-four patients served as the control group. All patients received 1000 mg of calcium and 800 IU of vitamin D. Computed tomography scans were repeated every fourth week until radiographic evidence of cortical bridging at the fracture site was confirmed. Functional outcome was assessed with use of a visual analog scale for pain and a Timed “Up and Go” test.

Results: The mean time to fracture healing was 7.8 weeks for the treatment group, compared with 12.6 weeks for the control group (p < 0.001). At eight weeks, all fractures in the treatment group were healed and four fractures in the control group were healed (healing rate, 100% compared with 9.1%; p < 0.001). Both the visual analog scale score for pain and the result of the Timed “Up and Go” test improved in the study group as compared with the control group (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: In elderly patients with osteoporosis, PTH 1-84 accelerates fracture-healing in pelvic fractures and improves functional outcome.

Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Footnotes

  • Investigation performed at Evangelisches Krankenhaus Wien, Vienna; Thermenklinikum Baden, Baden; and Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria

  • A commentary by Thomas A. Einhorn, MD, is linked to the online version of this article at jbjs.org.

  • Disclosure: None of the authors received payments or services, either directly or indirectly (i.e., via his or her institution), from a third party in support of any aspect of this work. One or more of the authors, or his or her institution, has had a financial relationship, in the thirty-six months prior to submission of this work, with an entity in the biomedical arena that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. No author has had any other relationships, or has engaged in any other activities, that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. The complete Disclosures of Potential Conflicts of Interest submitted by authors are always provided with the online version of the article.


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