Patient Satisfaction: Implications and Predictors of Success
Eric D. Shirley, MD; James O. Sanders, MD

Abstract

Abstract: Patient satisfaction is an individual’s cognitive evaluation of, and emotional reaction to, his or her health-care experience. This concept is increasing in importance as survey data are being used by health-care facilities for self-assessment, accreditation requirements, and compensation formulas. High patient satisfaction is associated with increased market share, financial gains, decreased malpractice claims, and improved reimbursement rates. Modifiable factors that contribute to satisfaction include physician-patient communication, the setting of appropriate expectations, minimization of waiting times, and provision of continuity of care. There are also factors that are less amenable to change, including chronic illness, opioid dependence, and sociodemographic status. Satisfaction with a surgical outcome differs from satisfaction with an office visit. Accurate expectations and patient-reported outcome measures are important determinants of satisfaction after a surgical procedure. Physicians can improve patient satisfaction in their practice by understanding the implications of satisfaction and the predictors of success.

Footnotes

  • Disclosure: None of the authors received payments or services, either directly or indirectly (i.e., via his or her institution), from a third party in support of any aspect of this work. One or more of the authors, or his or her institution, has had a financial relationship, in the thirty-six months prior to submission of this work, with an entity in the biomedical arena that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. No author has had any other relationships, or has engaged in any other activities, that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. The complete Disclosures of Potential Conflicts of Interest submitted by authors are always provided with the online version of the article.


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